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Fitzwilliam Museum


The exterior of Fitzwilliam MuseumTrumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1RB

Tel: 01233 332900
Fax: 01233 332933

fitzmuseum-enquiries@lists.cam.ac.uk


www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

© Fitzwilliam Museum

 

The Fitzwilliam Museum owes its foundation to Richard, 7th Viscount Fitzwilliam of Merrion who in 1816 bequeathed to the University of Cambridge his works of art and library together with funds to house them. The Museum opened in 1848 and acquired its first Japanese object in 1863.

 

The Japanese collections are divided between the Department of Paintings, Drawings and Prints and the Department of Applied Arts. The former has a superb collection of some 2,500 prints (including fan prints and 480 surimono), 400 drawings and 36 woodblock books. Highlights include very fine impressions of prints by Hokusai and Hiroshige, a unique complete album of Utamaro��s Chūshingura series, and the surimono collection. The Department of Applied Arts has a collection of some 1,300 Japanese objects plus about 300 items on long-term loan from private English collections. The collection is of high quality and includes pottery and porcelain, lacquer (including inro), netsuke, textiles, fans, sculpture, swords and armour, sword furniture (including tsuba), sculpture and examples of metalwork. The strength of the collection lies in its holdings of ceramics and lacquer.

 

 

 

 

 
Japanese, Arita; Kakiemon style, c.1680-1700 Figure of a bijin (beautiful lady)
Japanese, Arita; Kakiemon style,
c.1680-1700. Figure of a bijin (beautiful lady)
© Fitzwilliam Museum
 

Japanese, Fukui in Echizen province; 18th to first half of 19th century; Tsuba with cut-out dragon

Japanese, Fukui in Echizen province;
18th to first half of 19th century.
Tsuba with cut-out dragon

© Fitzwilliam Museum

 

 
 

 

 

     
 

Kitagawa Utamaro (1756-1806); Act 2 from the series showing the Ch?shingura drama parodied by famous beauties, c.1795
Kitagawa Utamaro (1756-1806); Act two from
the series showing the Chūshingura drama
parodied by famous beauties, c.1795
© Fitzwilliam Museum

 
Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1864); Bando Mitsugor? IV as Sekibei and Onoe Kikugor? III as Somezone in the play Snow and Love piled up at the Seki-no-to Barrier Gate, c.1832
Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1864); Bando Mitsugorō IV as Sekibei and Onoe Kikugorō III as Somezone in the play Snow and Love piled up at the
Seki-no-to Barrier Gate, c.1832
© Fitzwilliam Museum
 

 
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